Archive for the ‘N.T. Wright’ Category

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Piper versus Wright: Debating imputed righteousness

August 2, 2009

Versus

It seems that N.T Wright and John Piper are in a heavy debate over “righteousness”. Andrew Perriman has an interesting post over at open source theology where he explores both views. Personally both view to me have merit. I do think that the idea of “court of justice” type righteousness may be a bit misunderstood due to contextualization with the “American” view of what courts and Justice might be. I see more merit in the “ledger” view as it just makes more sense in the context over all. (At least to me).

Yet, either way, in a sense we do end up with “imputation” of Christ’s righteousness to us as by the Cross all things are being set right… so God’s righteousness is imputed and imparted to all creation and to us as we believe on Jesus.
Maybe I see things a bit differently from both… I am more Reformed than I care to admit, yet at the same time I am not Reformed as I see that there are many restrictions in the same sense the Roman Catholic dogmas inhibit understanding of Scripture. Sometimes trying to prove a doctrinal statement clouds what Scripture actually teaches and states.
So I pass it on to you who read this blog, and ask, what is your take? Not just what side of this argument you fall on, but rather, what do you see the Bible teaching?

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N.T. Wright Series on Hell and other questions.

January 25, 2009

These are great. Listen to the whole series.

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N.T. Wright Series on Hell and other questions.

January 25, 2009

These are great. Listen to the whole series.

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Some N. T. Wright…

May 6, 2008
N. T. Wright

2. On Worship:

3. On the Sacraments:

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Some N. T. Wright…

May 6, 2008
N. T. Wright

2. On Worship:

3. On the Sacraments:

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Great Quotes: N. T. Wright

February 16, 2008
“Our culture is very interested in life after death, but the New Testament is much more interested in what I’ve called the life after life after death — in the ultimate resurrection into the new heavens and the new Earth. Jesus’ resurrection marks the beginning of a restoration that he will complete upon his return. Part of this will be the resurrection of all the dead, who will “awake,” be embodied and participate in the renewal.” ~ N. T. Wright
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Great Quotes: N. T. Wright

February 16, 2008
“Our culture is very interested in life after death, but the New Testament is much more interested in what I’ve called the life after life after death — in the ultimate resurrection into the new heavens and the new Earth. Jesus’ resurrection marks the beginning of a restoration that he will complete upon his return. Part of this will be the resurrection of all the dead, who will “awake,” be embodied and participate in the renewal.” ~ N. T. Wright
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N.T Wright on Heaven

February 13, 2008

I have been heavily influenced by N. T. Wright. Now, saying that I may not agree on all points. Yet, one point I see that he is great at is getting to the point of some things most just take for granted… and often being so granted are just plain wrong.
The debate on “Hell” will go on, though I think that if one can wrap their mind around the proper teaching of the bible on Heaven, they will begin to grasp why the common idea of Hell needs to be looked at.
Bob Hyatt pointed to an interview with N. T. Wright that I think will help many start to understand why “BIBLICAL” understanding is important.
Be blessed,
iggy
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N.T Wright on Heaven

February 13, 2008

I have been heavily influenced by N. T. Wright. Now, saying that I may not agree on all points. Yet, one point I see that he is great at is getting to the point of some things most just take for granted… and often being so granted are just plain wrong.
The debate on “Hell” will go on, though I think that if one can wrap their mind around the proper teaching of the bible on Heaven, they will begin to grasp why the common idea of Hell needs to be looked at.
Bob Hyatt pointed to an interview with N. T. Wright that I think will help many start to understand why “BIBLICAL” understanding is important.
Be blessed,
iggy
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Great Quotes: N.T.Wright

November 11, 2007
What does the church do when faced with this huge swirling set of cultural movements and tensions? Most of us learned our trade, learned Christianity, and learned to preach and live the gospel within the resolutely modernist and industrial world. Some branches of Christianity, it is true, have managed to hold onto a premodern way of thinking and even of living, holding the modern world, let alone the postmodern world, at arm’s length. But most of us traditionally have articulated the gospel to people who thought and felt as modern people, particularly as “progress” people—people who thought that if they worked a little harder and pulled their weight a bit more strongly, everything would pan out. That modernist dream, translated into theology, sustains a sort of Pelagianism: pull yourself up by your moral bootstraps, save yourself by your own efforts. And since that was what Martin Luther attacked with his doctrine of justification by faith, we have preached a message, of grace and faith to a world of eager Pelagians. We have announced a pure spiritual message, uncorrupted by political and social reflection.
That looks fine to begin with. If you meet a Pelagian coming down the street, give him Augustine or Luther. But there are two problems with this procedure. First, of course, it is not what Saint Paul himself meant by justification by faith, but that is another subject for another day. Second, with the move to postmodernity, most of our contemporaries already, and all of them soon, will not be Pelagians any longer. Those who have abandoned the smokestack economy for the microchip, those who have denied all objective knowledge in favor of a world of feelings and impulses, those who have abandoned the arrogant Enlightenment “I” for the deconstmcted mass of signifiers, those who have torn down the great metanarrative and now play with different interchangeable stories as they come along—those who live in this world, which is increasingly our world, are not trying to pull themselves up by their moral bootstraps. Where would they pull themselves up to? Why would they bother? Who are “they,” anyway? Goal, motive, identity—all of these have been undermined by the shifting sands of postmodernity.
Faced with this situation, many have tried—some are still trying—to deny the presence of postmodernity, to retain the modern world in which we felt so comfortable and in which (whether we realize it or not) we preached a modernist gospel. Many want to turn the clock back, culturally and theologically.

It cannot be done.

My proposal to you is that we should not be frightened of the postmodern critique. It had to come. It is, I believe, a necessary judgment on the arrogance of modernity, and it is essentially a judgment from within. Our task is to reflect on this moment of despair within our culture and, reflecting biblically and Christianly, to see our way through the moment of despair and out the other side. ~ N.T.Wright The Resurrection and the Postmodern Dilemma
(Originally published in Sewanee Theological Review 41.2, 1998. Reproduced by permission of the author.)

Read the whole article here.